A recent visit to Arlington National Cemetery shows that military folk go in for portraits of themselves rather more frequently than the rest of the population. This is neither good nor bad. I found fourteen of them (one is a twofer). The majority are bas reliefs with two busts in the round mixed in. I’ll surely have missed some—Arlington National Cemetery is a vast place.

As usual, I omit as a category those little ceramic photo badges that folks glue on their tombstone and, if I had seen any, I would have omitted photographs etched on granite. I saw only two private mausolea in the whole place, and neither had a portrait within.

Major General Henry Tureman Allen, USA.

Figure 1. Henry Tureman Allen monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Allen, see here. He had an interesting life, exploring Alaska in the mid-1880s, Serving in Berlin as an attaché, fighting in the Spanish-American War in Cuba and the Philippines, governed Leyte there, went after Pancho Villa with Pershing, and commanded the American occupation zone in Germany after World War I. On his tombstone you see him commemorated for his leadership of the American Committee for German Children in 1923-24, which , says the Pedia of Wiki, distributed meals to one million German children.

Figure 1a. Henry Tureman Allen monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Brevet Major General William Worth Belknap, USA

Figure 2. William Worth Belknap monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Belknap, see here. This Princetonian was Secretary of War under Grant.

Figure 2a. William Worth Belknap monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Lieutenant Cushman Kellogg Davis, USA

Figure 3. Cushman Kellogg Davis monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Davis, who governed Minnesota and was later US Senator, see here.

Figure 3a. Cushman Kellogg Davis monument. Detail: portrait bust. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.
Figure 3b. Cushman Kellogg Davis monument. Detail: historical relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Talks at the Treaty of Paris to end the Spanish-American War?

Major General John Gibbon, USA

Figure 4. John Gibbon monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Gibbon, see here.

Figure 4a. John Gibbon monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Gibbon was intimately involved in the final actions of the war at Appomattox and was present at the great surrender scene. See his photo at the Wikipedia page linked above: he was quite striking with a bow tie on his buttoned-up military tunic. Here he appears rather older, as a major general.

Captain Sanders Walker Johnston, USA

Figure 5. Sanders Walker Johnston monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Sanders Johnston left no trace on the web.

Figure 5a. Sanders Walker Johnston monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

But ancestry dot com has a passport application from 1887, when he was 66 years old:
Stature: 5′ 9.25″
Forehead: medium
Eyes: blue
Nose: medium
Mouth: small
Chin: beard
Hair: light gray
Complexion: fair
Face: oval

Yep, that’s the spittin’ image of him in bronze!

Brevet Major General Benjamin Franklin Kelley, USA

Figure 6. Benjamin Franklin Kelley monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Kelley, see here. I’m sorry the monument is at a crazy angle. It was blocked by another directly in front of it.

I wouldn’t want this guy angry at me, that’s for sure.

Rear Admiral Richard Worsam Meade, III, USN

Figure 7. Richard Worsam Meade monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Richard Worsam Meade III, a nephew of George Gordon Meade, see here.

Figure 7a. Richard Worsam Meade monument. Detail: portrait bust. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Despite his pavilion, the birds have gotten him pretty well. See how the finish of the bust is decaying.

Second Lieutenant John Jay Moller, USA

Figure 8. John Jay Moller monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Moller, who died at 27, is unknown to the interwebs except for this monument. One wonders why he died in 1909. Natural causes?

Figure 8a. John Jay Moller monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Captain and Mrs. Otto Andreae Nesmith, USA

Figure 9. Otto Andreae and Blanche Vaughan Nesmith monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

The Nesmiths also lack a web presence. However, his mother’s maiden name was Maria Antoinette Gaal, which should count for something.

She was from Providence, he from California. With his mustache he looks like he should have flown a Sopwith Camel.

Brevet Lieutenant Colonel John Wesley Powell, USA

Figure 10. John Wesley Powell monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Powell, who needs no introduction, see here. The monument type is seen in a couple of places around Arlington and in Rock Creek Cemetery.

Figure 10a. John Wesley Powell monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

The patina here has decayed and the bronze looks a bit eaten away. It was probably once quite a pretty relief.

Brevet Major General Green Clay Smith, USA

Figure 11. Green Clay Smith monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

More about Green Clay Smith can be found here.

Figure 11a. Green Clay Smith monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

After serving as territorial governor of Montana after the Civil War, he returned to private life, became a baptist minister, and even ran for president of the US on the temperance ticket. Not much fun at parties, I ween.

Brevet Brigadier General Ellis Spear, USA

Figure 12. Ellis Spear monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Spear, see here.

Figure 12a. Ellis Spear monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

A nice portrait from the age of reconciliation. He was photographed by Brady and Handy with a Rutherford B. Hayes beard in the 1870s. Here he’s gone clean shaven.

Brigadier General Theodore J. Wint, USA

Figure 13. Theodore J. Wint monument. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

On Wint, see here.

Figure 13a. Theodore J. Wint monument. Detail: portrait relief. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA. Photo: author.

Nice treatment of the hair.

Published by gsb03632

A college professor living in Arlington, VA

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