A few more shots of Marywood yesterday evening and this morning, trying to discover the best light for the various parts of campus.

Figure 1. Nazareth Hall. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

I was able to place myself for a better shot of Nazareth Hall (figure 1), and though there’s some pincushion distortion, the building isn’t as crazily off-kilter as it was in the image I published in Marywood XI.

Figure 2. Decrepit maple, south of Nazareth Hall. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

When you move around Nazareth to the south there is a wonderful mid-century flagstone wall with this decrepit maple set off against it (figure 2). The maple is coming to the end of its life, but it is certainly still serving its decorative function!

Figure 3. School of Architecture. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

I was taken by the clear windows revealing workspaces within the School of Architecture building; and of course the geometry of the masonry and mullions was right up my alley (figure 3).

Figure 4. Learning Commons north side. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

The Learning Commons, which I have often photographed from its principal, glazed façade, also has pleasant aspects on the other ends. Here are the charcoal gray bricks of a mass on the north side of the building (figure 4).

Figure 5. Rotunda in reflecting pool. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

The wind was cooperating and the reflecting pool in the Italianate Garden was performing its function reasonably well. I even hoisted my Nikon up to take the photo: you can see the near edge of the pool because of it (figure 5): with the iPhone you can scrooch right down to the water.

Figure 6. Rotunda reflected in pool. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

But when I zoomed in a bit the turbulence in the pool became apparent (figure 6). I rather liked the image despite it.

Figure 7. Reflecting Pool in Italianate Garden. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

Have I ever shown you the reflecting pool? It’s quite small, maybe three feet above ground level (figure 7).

Figure 8. Learning Commons, primary façade. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

The light was not better than in Marywood XI, but it was a little whiter, since the sun was not quite so far down yesterday. Here it illuminates the Learning Commons, which is a quite thin, though long, building (figure 8). I think of it as a stage backdrop for the Italianate Garden and to present a public face to the principal approach to the campus through the main gate.

Figure 9. Italianate Garden. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

So, here is the Italianate Garden, and the Reflecting Pool is there at the intersection of the N-S path with the little paved plaza (figure 9).

Figure 10. Regina Hall. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

Having picked up my wife after work, we departed out the rear door of the Rotunda and I took this photograph of the working side of Regina Hall. As I’ve said before, I like the buff brick, but yesterday I decided to snap this (figure 10) because of some quality in the big silver duct, and the geometry of the ironworks on the side of the building.

Figure 11. Regina Hall, west side. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

The setting sun painted the shadows of the trees onto the western façade of Regina Hall, and by now the light was rather more golden (figure 11).

Figure 12. Learning Commons, rear (east) façade. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

One can see how the money was spent (sensibly) on the western façade of the Learning Commons, leaving a rather nondescript brick façade (figure 12) to face onto a large quad behind it. But as you can see, it’s quite nice from some angles, and with this image we are now seeing the campus in morning light from the east.

Figure 13. Learning Commons. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

I did not peek, but such a wooden palisade (figure 13) usually hides trash cans or other service items. For me, the painting, as well as the geometries of the masonry masses was worth recording.

Figure 14. The Rotunda. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

The Rotunda is always worth observing, in just about any light, from just about any angle (figure 14). You know, you can even see the dome quite clearly from Dickson City all the way across the Lackawanna Valley.

Figure 15. Moss-covered rock. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

This moss-covered rock (figure 15), part of a monumental set of steps up to the big quad behind the Learning Commons, captured my eye. It would be happier on a rainy or even cloudy day, but the colors still popped in the late morning light.

Figure 16. Dickson City from the Rotunda Steps. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

And here is that very Dickson City whence one can see the Rotunda, captured from the front steps of the Rotunda (figure 16). That’s the Sheetz gas station in red.

Figure 17. Maple tree near Main Gate. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

At least one tree on campus is getting into the spirit of the season (figure 17), and I always like those mixed displays of the trees that just can’t decide whether to go over or not.

Figure 18. Maple tree near Main Gate, detail. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

And its display was stunning when brought into the foreground! (Figure 18).

Figure 19. The Rotunda. Marywood University, Scranton, PA. Photo: author.

And as so often, my parting shot was of the Rotunda, from under one of the oak trees (figure 19).

Published by gsb03632

A college professor living in Arlington, VA

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