Floods and Schallers IV

Six children, all born live: a demographically lucky Victorian family. We’ve seen that the Cornelius Schaller family had been augmented by a first child, Ellen, and had, for unknown reasons, moved to New York City. In fact, Ellen was an American citizen, and as we’ll see in detail in Floods and Schallers V, Robert Cornelius […]

Floods and Schallers VI

The Great Necropolis. On 12 April 1866 Cornelius Washington Schaller, brother of my great-grandmother Florence May Schaller, died at the age of 3 years, 6 months, and 4 days. Lines of evidence point to the grief that any family would feel at such a wrenching occurrence, evidence that must not be overlooked even though it […]

Floods and Schallers III

Cornelius and Ellen Elizabeth Ann As we saw in the last post, Cornelius Robert Schaller, bachelor, had married Ellen Elizabeth Ann Flood, spinster, on 6 January 1852, cementing their fathers’ business partnership. By 1856, we saw that Cornelius and his counterpart, James Flood, junior, appear to have become the principles in the Flood and Schaller […]

The Floods and Schallers II

The family business Flood and Schaller Business Card. Date unknown, probably before 1855. The story begins with a business alliance between two London families in the reign of George III. One had as its patriarch James Flood, a cabinet maker. His wife appears to have been Cebella. The head of the other was Joseph Schaller, […]

The Floods and Schallers I

A great-great-great-great-great granddaughter of Joseph Schaller, Genevieve Alston Bucher. Prospect Hill Cemetery, Omaha, Nebraska. Looking through family documents, I’ve come across an interesting tale of the melding of two middle class London families through an arc across the Regency and Victorian eras. This story has the usual drama of social climbing and a whiff of […]

Συγγράμματα

Συγγράμματα (Essays) The name συγγράμματα (syngrammata) is Ancient Greek for “essays.” Or rather, since those people didn’t quite have the genre as we know it, it’s a word that comes reasonably close. And so you may rightly infer that I had a classical education and that I am interested in essays. This blog betrays my […]